Betsy Morris // Homes

When I was a young mother I wanted to practice hospitality, but I wanted to do so under one condition—everything must be PERFECT. I wanted to maintain a certain idealism to the on looking world. I stressed my family out routinely to entertain with “grace and ease,” which was so far from the truth. In fact, my children have confessed how they would dread company. Slowly, God is setting me free from the burden of caring so much about what weaknesses people may see in me. Instead, the compelling love for Christ is growing inside me, creating a desire for people to experience a sense of “home” with believers who care about them. My desire for the gospel message to be lived out as well as spoken is overcoming my fear, and hospitality is getting easier. God wants to use our homes and to change us in the process!

Hospitality is a risk. We are allowing others into our personal lives through our home. What if people catch a glimpse of something about us that shows our weaknesses—something in my parenting, my marriage, my housekeeping, or my cooking? It is also easier not to expend all that energy while you are being exposed. So, why do it all? The quick answer is that Christians are commanded to practice hospitality in Romans 12:9. The heart answer is that people need to see “reality” in the lives of believers and see “home” lived out before them. The motivating factor is the love of Christ compelling us to live for others and not just for ourselves.

  • Read Romans 12:3-13 and Philippians 2:1-4
     
  • God gives us all different gifts, but we are all still commanded to practice hospitality. What does it mean to show sacrificial love to others for the love of Christ in my home?
     
  • How do I want God to change me or help me in this area?

Answer any of these questions either in the comments section below or join the conversation with our Facebook Community Group. #undividedwomen

// Betsy


Betsy Morris is the wife of Henry Morris, an associate pastor at First Presbyterian Church. She has 3 children at Auburn University—John Hardin 21, Carolyn and Henry 19. Currently, she is the Executive Director at Wiregrass Hope Group.